713-858-6238

May

The refuge is home to opossums, squirrels, and raccoons this spring. 8 healthy squirrels were released successfully on May 1. 7 opossums came but, ever so sadly, only one remains. Rehabbing opossums is very difficult: they must be tube fed since they don't suck. Once they're weaned, usually they simply eat and grow until they are 7-10 inches long from the point of their nose to their rump. But not all goes smoothly at times. Only one will be released when it grows a couple more inches. Based on the way it scoffed up the scrambled eggs this afternoon, release won't be long. 
6 raccoons have arrived over the last few weeks, and 5 remain. They were the hardest to take the bottle, but at present, the surviving 5 are eating happily. They have a rather flat mouth with a flat tongue that curls up around the baby bottle's nipple. Watching the bubbles flow through the formula as they suck is the rehabber's dream: they are growing with each suck. The baby raccoon on the banner picture is one of mine, successfully released last year.
Curly Q Ranch Refuge is a 59-acre wildlife refuge, home to many rescued, rehabilitated, and realized wildlife. Linda is a Texas Parks and Wildlife licensed rehabber, almost living in a constant state of around-the-clock nursing. The raccoon on the home page is one of her babies.
Of the many things I have learned that it is very expensive to rehab wildlife, in addition to the vast number of hours invested. Raccoons, for example, are raised on KMR, Kitten Milk Replacement, which sells for $12.98 for 6 ounces of powder. One-half cup of powder is mixed with one cup of warm water, and raccoons eat a lot!
I am reimbursed for some expenses by Lone Star Wildlife Rescue, my associate non-profit 501.c.3. If you ever want to be sure that 100% of money goes directly to the animals, donate to LSWR!
All of the proceeds from the cabin rentals go back into the care of the animals and the maintenance of the ranch for guests to share. Above all, guests must respect nature, avoid excessive noise, be very aware of their surroundings, and leave the ranch refuge as pristine as they found it.